Jason M. Kelly

read our new book

An Anthropocene Primer

Recent Publications

   

Rivers of the Anthropocene

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS, 2017
EDITED BY JASON M. KELLY, PHILIP SCARPINO, HELEN BERRY, JAMES SYVITSKI, MICHEL MEYBECK

This exciting volume presents the research of the Rivers of the Anthropocene Network , an international collaborative group of scientists, social scientists, humanists, artists, policy makers, and community organizers working to produce innovative transdisciplinary research on global freshwater systems. Featuring contributions from authors in a rich diversity of disciplines—from toxicology to archaeology to philosophy—this book is an excellent resource for students and scholars studying both freshwater systems and the Anthropocene. 

    

An Anthropocene Primer VERSION 1.0

October 2017
Edited by Jason m. Kelly and Fiona P. Mcdonald

An Anthropocene Primer is an innovative open access, open peer review publication that guides learners through the complex concepts and debates related to the Anthropocene, including climate change, pollution, and environmental justice. Version 1.0 of An Anthropocene Primer is hosted by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute as an open access book, which we are releasing during Open Access Week in October 2017. In collaboration with Indiana University Press, we are inviting the public to participate in an open peer review of the volume until February 1, 2018.

     

Reading the Grand Tour at a Distance: Archives and Datasets in Digital History

American Historical Review, April 2017

This essay examines the limits and potentials of digital history, especially as it relates to the construction of archives and digital datasets. Through a critical reading of the sources used to create the Grand Tour Project—part of the Mapping the Republic of Letters project at Stanford University—it shows the ways in which datasets can both hide and embody hierarchies of power. This piece offers suggestions for alternative readings of the Grand Tour narrative. It ends by summarizing a series of challenges faced by historians as they contemplate best practices for creating and maintaining digital datasets in the twenty-first century.